Hasbro Trade Mark Infringement Claim Stops Launch

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Alleged infringement of the TRANSFORMERS trade mark recently sparked a dispute between the leading computer technology company Asus and Hasbro, a multinational games business.

Hasbro is the maker of a line of toy alien robots named Transformers, able to disguise themselves as automobiles. The Transformers universe features two warring factions of these robots: the Autobots and the Decepticons. First introduced in 1984 the robots have, in the course of nearly thirty years, spawned comic books, animated TV series and a live-action movie franchise.

Filing suit for trade mark infringement, Hasbro alleges that Asus’ release of the Transformer Prime laptop takes advantage of the trade mark in order to make money, a representative stating that ‘Hasbro continues to aggressively protect its brands and products and the specific actions we are taking today against Asus underscores yet again Hasbro’s willingness to pursue companies who misappropriate our intellectual property for their own financial gain.’

So, why is a toy company concerned about a consumer electronics business using the word TRANSFORMERS?  After all, there seems to have been no quarrel between Hasbro and Boots over registration of TRANSFORMERS for cosmetics. How likely are consumers to be confused into linking Asus to the Autobots?  Tablet devices and toys do seem quite far removed from each other.  However, the combination of TRANSFORMER and PRIME does offer some support to Hasbro’s case as discussed below.

Asus has used the word TRANSFORMER when naming its products in the past, releasing the Eee Pad Transformer tablet device at the beginning of January. However, this time round the addition of the word ‘Prime’ has given rise to suspicion, as the leader of one of the robot factions is a character called ‘Optimus Prime’. Hasbro is not sure that this is just a coincidence.

Included in Hasbro’s trade mark portfolio are registrations and applications for the trade mark TRANSFORMERS PRIME in various jurisdictions.  While not yet registered in the US, Hasbro does own UK and European registrations for these words, originally filed in June 2010.  TRANSFORMERS PRIME is clearly a much closer match than just TRANSFORMERS, but is not registered against tablet devices.  It remains to be seen whether the notoriety of the TRANSFORMERS brand will tip the case in Hasbro’s favour despite differences in the goods sold under the mark.

Techweek draws a parallel between the tablet and the robots, noting that ‘the major selling point of the Asus Transformer Prime is that it converts [transforms?] into a form that closely resembles a laptop when the keyboard dock is used’, so mimicking the Transformers’ ability to disguise themselves as vehicles.  Still, the word ‘transformer’ is somewhat descriptive in this context, arguably referencing the functionality of the product rather than ripping off the robot franchise.  Dailytech further observes that ‘The Transformer Prime doesn’t convert into a truck, and the Transformer toys don’t offer the Android operating system with apps and Web-browsing capabilities.’

Asus claims that internal studies have shown ‘no issues’ with its use of the Transformer brand indicating an intention to stick with the name, but if Hasbro has its way it could be some time before the tablet reaches consumers.

One thought on “Hasbro Trade Mark Infringement Claim Stops Launch

  1. Sheogorath

    “Asus Transformer isn’t infringing
    on Hasbro’s trademark.”
    Which it isn’t. In order to be infringing on Hasbro’s trademark, Asus’s product has to be a toy, and it has to be sufficiently similar to create confusion in the minds of Joe Bloggs, both of which it is neither. Just because something’s an Android, doesn’t mean folk will automatically think it’s an Autobot or a Decepticon.

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